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For The Love of Oscar: Our 2015 Report

Written by Graeme Wood
24.02.15

 

 oscars-2014_kushfilms

As the year’s major award ceremonies draw to a close it’s easy to see which films have been the clear winners and the losers. This year more than any other it seems the glitz and glamour of our awards ceremonies have been under attack for their lack of recognition and prize-giving to a slew of actors and films that appear to have been snubbed. While you could usually rely on BAFTA to recognize its home grown talent this year it bizarrely missed out on nominating Selma or its British star David Oyelowo but there was also a distinct lack of recognition for black and ethnic minority based talent from the UK.

As Oscars host Neil Patrick Harris ribbed in his opening monologue “Tonight we honour Hollywood’s Neil_Patrick_Harris_at_the_best and whitest. Sorry, brightest!” The host drawing attention to the controversy that has dogged this year’s nominations and awards, so concerned were the ceremony organisers that it seems they were anxious to fill the presenter’s roles with as may non-Caucasian faces as possible. Drafting in a number of more ethnically mixed presenters including; Kerry Washington, Eddie Murphy, David Oyeleow, Zoe Saldana and Viola Davis, in what appeared to be an effort to dampen the cries of a lack of diversity and snubbing.

While the Independent Spirit Awards earlier in the week had mirrored many of this year’s other award ceremonies; Birdman taking Best Picture, Richard Linklater taking Best Director, Michael Keaton taking Best Actor, Julianne Moore winning Best Actress, JK Simmons holding onto Best Supporting Actor and Patricia Arquette taking home Best Supporting Actress. They did however gift the Best First Screenplay Award to Justin Simien for Dear White People. Would Oscar go further and do the unexpected to surprise us with some new winners?

Well yes and no, Birdman led the evening taking home Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Cinematography awards. The Grand Budapest Hotel took home a clutch of technical awards including Costume Design, Production Design, Best Original Score, Make Up & Hairstyling and Costume. The hotly contested Best Actor category was won by the UK’s Eddie Redmayne forEddieRedmayne The Theory of Everything, Julianne Moore continued her winning streak taking home Best Actress for Alzheimer’s drama Still Alice (due in the UK in March), JK Simmons deservedly took away Best Supporting Actor and Patricia Arquette walked away with another Best Supporting Actress win. Arquette won over the audience with her speech addressing it to ‘every woman who gave birth to every taxpayer and citizen of this nation”. “We have fought for everybody’s equal rights. It’s our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal rights for women in the United States of America”. It was the only win of the evening for Boyhood, a big award winner elsewhere, having been nominated in six categories. The other biggest losers of the evening were The Imitation Game picking up only 1 award out of 8 nominations and American Sniper picking up 1 award out of six nominations.

As was expected Big Hero 6 took home the Best Animated Feature award (The Lego Movie having cruelly been overlooked for nomination). And what of Selma, nominated in only two categories, Best Selma_CorineScott_MLKPicture and Best Song, the official excuse being the film had been released too late to be campaigned for successfully. Selma’s Glory written by John Stephens and Lonnie Lynn – better known as John Legend and Common- walked away with the Oscar for Best Song, also performing the track captivatingly live at the ceremony. During the intense, powerful performance Selma star David Oyelowo was visibly moved to tears and at the finale many of the Academy were on the feet in appreciation. Collecting his award Legend said; “We live in the most incarcerated country in the world…people are marching with our song, we are with you…March on!” Some were less impressed with Lady Gaga’s Sound of Music tribute however, Shonda Rhimes tweeting; ‘That was not okay. I mean, Idina is there. She is right there. RIGHT THERE. And oh dear God, Julie had to hear that,” The Scandal showwriter referencing both Julie Andrews and Idina Menzel who were in the audience. Billboard however, thought it was the second best performance of the night.

The Academy Awards are no stranger to controversy its perceived snubs dating all the way back to a lack of recognition for Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights and Modern Times films. Each year brings a new list of should have beens like Shawshank Redemption, Audrey Hepburn, Judy Garland, Spike Lee, Jack Nicholson, Ben Afleck and many more. Many, like myself, wonder how a film can be nominated in the Best Film category and yet the director not be nominated, this has happened many times and again this year with Selma nominated as Best Film but no nomination for its director Ava DuVernay.

So what is the worth of an Oscar Nomination and even a win? Do the awards signal industry recognition of talent and art, or are they a celebration of a critical or box office success? Certainly in terms of getting a nomination the prestige can provide a secondary bout of marketing and see the film resurface into theatres with a guaranteed boost in box office sales. This year’s BAFTA wins for The Grand Budapest Hotel, Whiplash and The Theory of Everything helped boost these films at the February UK box office. Similarly last year Gravity, The Wolf of Wall Street and 12 Years A Slave also benefited from their BAFTA nominations and wins.

Does the winning of an Oscar guarantee the actor offers of the best available roles and most prestigious films on offer? Well you only have to look at Halle Berry’s career for that answer, following her Academy Award win in 2002 for Monster’s Ball, which was seen as a major break through for black actresses at the time, her roles have consisted of mostly superhero sequels and forgettable horror thrillers. Similarly, Denzel Washington, who also won in 2002 for Training Day, can hardly have noticed any change in his career – although he still turning out an impressive and consistent body of work but not always getting the headline grabbing prestigious roles.

Hattie McDaniel the very first African American actor to win an Academy Award back in 1939 for Gone With The Wind found her career continually consigned to little more than bit parts and maid HattieMcDaniel_kushfilmsroles following her Academy win. McDaniel broke into movies after many years singing in choruses and working as an extra until David O.Selznick cast her as Mammy in the epic but troubled production of Gone With The Wind. She later found herself censured by many of her own race for continuing to play the stereotypical role of a menial in films and for not criticising Hollywood’s portrayal of Negros on the big screen. McDaniel remained ‘in love’ with Hollywood and acting as she later said; though her treatment at the time is now considered something of a scandal, The Awards that year were held at The Cocoanut Grove nightclub, part of the Ambassador Hotel, which then had a strict no-blacks policy, McDaniel was not allowed to sit with the rest of the film’s crew and was placed at a separate table near the far back of the room. Gone With The Wind producer Selznick had to call in a special favour just to have McDaniel allowed into the building. Her win led to her being pigeon-holed in stereotypical roles and the NAACP disowned her for ‘perpetuating negative stereotypes’. Following her death, in 1952, her Oscar which had been left to Howard University was deemed valueless by appraisers and later went missing from the school, her final wish – to be buried in the Hollywood Cemetery was denied her because of the colour of her skin. In 1944 she had this to say about her disappointing prospects following the Oscar win, “It was as if I had done something wrong”.

More recently Mo’Nique, who picked up Best Supporting Actress in 2010 for her performance in ‘Precious’, has complained that she’s lost out on several roles due to not campaigning for her award. She says Precious director Les Daniels has told her that the perception in Hollywood is that she is monique-precious-oscars‘difficult’ ‘tacky’ and as a result has been blackballed, losing out on several key roles that were offered then later withdrawn.

At the 2010 awards ceremony Mo’Nique wore white gardenias in her hair – just as Hattie McDaniel had done in 1940 when she picked up her Oscar. During her acceptance speech the actress thanked McDaniel ‘for enduring all that she had to, so that I would not have to”. In response to the criticism McDaniel faced for taking maid roles Mo’Nique had this to say: “Well tell me what other roles were available, because what she was; was an actress – and at the time, she wasn’t getting the roles that her white counterparts were getting. She was saying,’I’m an actress. When you say ‘cut’ I’m not (a maid anymore). “So I say to those people: know that woman in full before you judge.”

Les Daniels himself offered this statement on Mo’Nique’s interview: “Mo’nique is a creative force to be reckoned with. Her demands through Precious were not always in line with the campaign. This soured her relationship with the Hollywood community”.

A recent Los Angeles Times survey of the 6,028 Academy Award voters revealed that 94% of Voters are White, while 77% of those are also Men; only 2% of the voters were Black with another 2% Latino.

This year has seen a more centralised campaign to bring more diversity to the Academy. Black activist organisation ‘Colour of Change’ have launched an online campaign and petition for the Academy to disclose it’s make up of diversity numbers and accused the Academy of marginalizing Black art because the membership is overwhelmingly white. The campaign began largely because of the perceived snubbing of Selma particularly the lack of nominations for its lead actor and director.

The debate has been fuelled also by interviews given to the Hollywood Reporter by members of the Academy, an anonymous Academy member said;” What no one wants to say out loud is that Selma is a well-crafted movie, but there’s no art to it. If the movie had been directed by a 60 year old white male, I don’t think that people would have been carrying on about it to the level that they were. And as far as the accusations about the Academy being racist? Yes, most members are white males, but they are not the cast of Deliverance-they had to get into the Academy to begin with, so they’re not cretinous, snaggletoothed hillbillies. When a movie about black people is good, members vote for it. But if the movie isn’t that good, am I supposed to vote for it just because it has black people in it? I’ve got to tell you, having the cast show up in T-shirts saying ‘I can’t breathe’ – I thought that stuff was offensive. Did they want to be known for making the best movie of the year of for stirring up shit”. The Academy member went on to praise American Sniper, Birdman and The Imitation Game as being their picks of the year but felt Boyhood was less of a success; “If you told me when I saw Boyhood that it would win best picture-or even be in the running-I would have told you that you were insane. Watching it, I thought it was ambitious and a directorial triumph, but the kid was uneven and Patricia Arquette probably was sorry she agreed to let them film her age over 12 years”.

Another Academy Voter had this to say about this year’s crop of nominations; “Whiplash is offensive – it’s a film about abuse and I don’t find that entertaining at all. The Grand Budapest Hotel is beautifully made but its story just isn’t special. I didn’t think Selma was a particularly good film, apart from the main actor (David Oyelowo) and I think the outcry about the Academy being racist for not nominating it for more awards is offensive – we have a two term president who is a black woman (Cheryl Boone Isaacs) and we give out awards to black people when they deserve them, just like any other group. Birdman I didn’t get at all-I look around and its doing so well and I just don’t get it”. While another Academy member felt American Sniper had been entertaining, Birdman masterful, The Grand Budapest Hotel underrated, of The Imitation Game they said ‘it had it all; Nazis, gays, World War II. Nobody does this sort of movie better than Harvey Weinstein”. Of Selma the anonymous Academy member commented ‘I thought Selma was great but it just came out too late. And if the director (Ava DuVernay) suffered from anything, it was gender discrimination, not racial discrimination. This whole race thing was spun out of control by the press”.

In a recent interview Spike Lee also pitched in on the Selma controversy; “We don’t have to even use Selma as an example. We could use Do The Right Thing versus Driving Miss F*****ing Daisy. But Do The Right Thing wasn’t the only thing the Academy messed up. My point is; it’s not a new problem. And great art is going to prevail. The door (to black filmmakers) is not knocked down. It’s cracked open a little bit. I wish that door was wide open”.

Lee and Low Books recently published an infographic showing the make up of the Academy that proves a troubling lack of diversity, independent filmmaker Gina Prince-Bythewood prince-bythewood-gina-imagetold Lee & Low; “The numbers do not surprise me because very few Academy Award level films with no white leads are being greenlit. Until this changes the abysmal numbers will not change. The box office drives which films get greenlit. The hope is that with this year’s success of a variety of films with African American leads, Hollywood will be more open to taking chances.” Lee & Low published the infographic as part of their ‘Diversity Gap’ study series and have monitored a lack of diversity across the Emmy Awards, Tony Awards, the NY Times Top 10 Bestseller List, the children’s book industry and politics. “The lack of diversity across these various industries has been ‘disturbingly consistent’, the publisher wrote, “This is not an isolated incident, but a wide reaching social problem”

There is hope that with all the pressure that one day things will change (hopefully soon!)
Hattie_McDaniel_12thOscars

 

 

Read Hattie McDaniel’s 1947 Hollywood Reporter Essay:
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/hattie-mcdaniel-defies-critics-1947-774493

Read the full Hollywood Reporter interview with comedian/actress Mo’Nique:
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/monique-i-was-blackballed-winning-774616?source=gravity

Read the Hollywood Reporter’s interviews with Academy Members here;
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/race/brutally-honest-oscar-ballot-2015-773902

View and support the Colour of Change petition here:
http://act.colorofchange.org/sign/oscars_diversify/?t=1&akid=4126.747541.gIn_nT

The EE BAFTA’S – Winners Round-Up & Usual Diversity Issues!

Written By Graeme Wood
09.02.15

 

BAFTA_Winners

Champagne and back slapping at the ready, it’s another year and another awards ceremony! This years BAFTA film awards held no surprises for anyone who had even a cursory glance through the nominations or looked at award winners so far this year. While there was some worthy winners amongst the technical nominees the big awards could all have been safely predicted ahead of the ceremony.

JK Simmons was a shoe-in for Best Supporting Actor following his mesmerising and powerful performance in Whiplash, as was the critically acclaimed Eddie Redmayne picking up ‘Best Actor’, BAFT_JK-Simmonsfor his touching portrayal of Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything. Julianne Moore picked up ‘Best Actress’ but has already received several nominations and prizes for her role in the yet to be seen in the UK movie Still Alice and similarly Patricia Arquette, picking up ‘Best Supporting Actress’, has received several nominations and awards for her turn in Boyhood.

The clear winners of the evening were Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, winning Best Director and Best Film, and James Marsh’s The Theory of Everything, picking up ‘Outstanding British Film’ and Adapted Screenplay. Birdman and The Grand Budapest Hotel were left running just behind with Birdman’s Emmanuel Lubezki picking up the much deserved Cinematography BAFTA. While Wes Anderson’s quirky The Grand Budapest Hotel picked up awards for ‘Costume Design, Make-Up, Music, Production and Best Screenplay’. Damian Chazelle’s Whiplash deservedly picked up the awards for its Editing and Sound the two combined in the film to provide a mesmerising back-drop to JK Simmons and Miles Teller’s powerful performances.

The popular Pride was granted some recognition and picked up the award for Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer. The EE ‘Rising Star’ Award had strong competition but the public vote went to ‘71s charismatic Jack O’Connell a choice which also seemed popular with the BAFTA audience.
BAFTA_JOConnell&McAvoy

Surprisingly The Imitation Game which has already had many awards and nominations elsewhere failed to pick up anything despite being nominated in several categories. Christopher Nolan’s ‘Interstellar’ which failed to light up the box office or critics also missed out on any of the big nominations.

The biggest disappointment from the awards however surely came from the nominations themselves and the films that failed to pick up even a cursory nod from the judging panel. It truly astounds that critically acclaimed and popular films such as Amma Asante’s ‘Belle’ failed to receive a nomination, even for its outstanding costume design, or that the powerful and relevant ‘Selma’ failed to be recognised by the panel. Surely when you have a British talent like David Oyelowo giving a strong performance that is critically acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic it deserves to be recognised? There is also a strong argument that Timothy Spall’s outstanding performance in Mike Leigh’s Mr Turner deserved a place in the Best Actor category.

All eyes are now on the 87th Academy Awards which take place on the 22nd of February, will Boyhood continue its run of wins as Best Picture or will the inclusion of Selma see an Academy turnaround? Can Richard Linklater nab the Best Director Oscar or will Wes Anderson see recognition for The Grand Budapest Hotel. David Oyelowo is missing again from the Best Actor nominations so we might see Eddie Redmayne continue his winning streak although the inclusion of Bradley Cooper and American Sniper’s strong box-office performance may be a surprise winner. Julianne MooreBAFTA_JulianneMoore seems likely at this point to walk away with Best Actress and I’d be very surprised, and a little disappointed, if JK Simmons doesn’t come away with Best Supporting Actor. Patricia Arquette seems likely to continue her winning streak as Best Supporting Actress for Boyhood, though Emma Stone is also a hot contender for her performance in Birdman. While the wonderful Lego Movie managed to pick up Best Animated Feature at this year’s BAFTA it’s bizarrely been missed out of the Oscar nominations so don’t be surprised if Big Hero 6 walks away as this year’s winner.

John Stephen’s and Lonnie Lynn’s ‘Glory’ from Selma has been nominated and is expected to win this year’s ‘Best Song’ Oscar but wouldn’t it be fun if ‘Everything is Awesome’ from the Lego Movie won instead?

It all depends of course on how much relevance you place on the nominations, awards and industry panels against your own preferences and views. Away from the plaudits, box office and competition a bigger issue lay in the representation of our culture and the industry itself. Looking at the BAFTA audience, nominees and winners all many viewers could see were row after row of Caucasian faces and surely this can not be an accurate representation of the diverse body of filmmakers or challenging films that have been produced throughout the last year.

Not so long ago the nominees and audience were full of fresh new hopefuls like Adam Deacon, Noel Clarke, Chiwetel Ejifor, Sophie Okonedo, David Harewood, Idris Elba and some of these have adam_deaconsubsequently found more prominent opportunities and work abroad rather than in the UK. The broadsheets have been quick to point out the lack of diversity from the BAFTA ceremony, particularly Chris Bryant in his column for the Independent. New initiatives (especially from the BFI & TV sector) have become meaningless, which are not worth their weight in hope.

So the debate meanwhile continues but none the less as we have seen over the years there is no significant change. However, it is evident that more work and career opportunities leading to prestige international exposure for minority film industry personnel would certainly bring a higher diversified profile to the UK film industry and so the question must be asked of BAFTA why no recognition for films like; Selma, Belle, Honeytrap, Second Coming and the many other diverse cinema offerings produced from a home-grown pool of black, Asian and minority ethnic talent. A recent Taking Part survey concluded that black and minority ethnic participation in the arts lags nearly 10 per cent behind white participation. It’s a disturbing under-representation for a community that consists of 12 per cent of the total population.

If this year’s BAFTA’s failed to totally represent the cinema audience or the UK talent pool it did however signal a growing strength and confidence in British film making which can only be for the good of the industry as whole (we hope?).

Read Chris Bryant MP Independent Newspaper article here:
http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/baftas-2015-britain-is-diverse-so-why-is-our-tv-and-film-so-overwhelmingly-white-10034762.html

Winners & Losers at Golden Globes & BAFTA Exemptions

Written by: Graeme Wood
12/01/15

golden-globe-awards-golden-

The announcement of the nominees for this year’s BAFTA Film Awards saw some obvious commercial and critical nods but, and more surprisingly, saw several startling omissions. While box office headliners The Imitation Game, The Theory of Everything, Boyhood and Birdman were shoe-ins for Best Film and leading actors Benedict Cumberbatch and Eddie Redmayne were obvious contenders for Best Actor, it was more surprising to see Wes Anderson’s “The Grand Budapest Hotel” lead the nominations with 11 nods including Best Film, Original Screenplay and Best Actor for Ralph Fiennes.

Acclaimed Belfast thriller ’71 was only nominated in the Outstanding British Film category, along with Pride, Paddington and Under The Skin. Yann Demange director of ’71 has been nominated for Outstanding Debut by A British Director along with writer Gregory Burke.

The controversial omissions came with no nominations at all for the critically acclaimed civil rights drama ‘Selma’, although the film won’t be released in the UK until February it has already scored big in the US and apparently the panel have seen screeners of the film and it is eligible for this year’s awards. The snub appears all the more bizarre given the host of British talent on display in the movie – David Olywelo has already been nominated for several awards and his performance acclaimed by critics. There is also a further notable presence of Brit actors in the cast with Tim Roth, Tom Wilkinson and Carmen Ejogo.

Of concern now to the producers of Selma is that a reported 50 BAFTA Awards voters are also Academy Awards voters which may in turn lead to a lack of Oscar nominations for the film and its crew.

Mike Leigh’s biographical drama ‘Mr Turner’ had four BAFTA nominations though it was a surprise to see this miss out on inclusion in major categories such as Best Film and Best Actor for Timothy Spall’s acclaimed titular performance.

High profile American films “American Sniper” and “Unbroken” also missed out on nominations along with their directors Clint Eastwood and Angelina Jolie.

Elsewhere ‘Selma’ has featured heavily in this year’s other award lists with nominations for Best Actor, Best Film and the historic Best Director Golden Globe nomination for Ava DuVernay. The Globe Ceremony, was held on January 11th and despite high expectations for ‘Selma’ the film only managed to pick up the Award for Best Original Song – Glory written and performed by John Legend and Common.

The runaway success of the Globe’s was Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’, picking up the Gobes for Best Picture, Director and Best Supporting Actress going to Patricia Arquette for her performance in the film. “The Grand Budapest Hotel” managed to nab the award for Best Picture-Musical or Comedy only, while Britain’s Eddie Redmayne picked up the Best Actor Globe for his performance as Stephen Hawking in ‘The Theory of Everthing’. Michael Keaton picked up the award for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy for his career defining performance in “Birdman”, while Julianna Moore picked up the Best Actress Drama award for “Still Alice” and Amy Adams came away with the Best Actress-Musical or Comedy Globe for her role in the Tim Burton directed ‘Big Eyes’.

A disappointing result then for supporters of “Selma” who felt the film deserved greater recognition particularly for its director and lead actor David Oyelowo. The film meanwhile has 8 nominations in the NAACP Image Awards, to be held on February 6th, including Outstanding Motion Picture, Best Actor, Director, Supporting Actor and Actress. The film will be up against Amma Asante’s “Belle” for Best Picture and Ava Duvernay will be up against Amma Asante who is also nominated for “Belle”. Gugu Mbatha Raw is nominated for Best Actress also for ‘Belle’ and faces competition from Quvenzhane Wallis, ‘Annie’, Taraji P.Henson, ‘No Good Deed’, Tessa Thompson, ‘Dear White People’, and Viola Davis ‘The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby”, strong competition indeed. ‘Selma’ has also picked up five nominations in the Independent Spirit Awards though surprisingly didn’t pick up any nominations from the Screen Actors Guild or the Producers Guild Awards. All eyes will now be on the much anticipated Oscar Nominations to be held on January 15th.

The BAFTA Film Awards will be held at London’s Royal Opera House on Sunday 8th February 2015.
Read The Guardian article on the BAFTA nominations here:
http://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2015/jan/09/bafta-nominations-2015-a-tough-turner-events-and-a-hard-selma

See a full list of the BAFTA 2015 nominations here:
http://awards.bafta.org/award/2015/film

 


 

All The Winners At The 2015 Golden Globes

Courtesy of www.buzzfeed.com
Written by: Emily Orley
12/01/15

Best Motion Picture Drama

Best Motion Picture Drama

IFC Films

Winner: Boyhood

Foxcatcher
The Imitation Game
Selma
The Theory of Everything

Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama

Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama

Liam Daniel / Focus Features

Winner: Eddie Redmayne, The Theory of Everything

Steve Carell, Foxcatcher
Benedict Cumberbatch, The Imitation Game
Jake Gyllenhaal, Nightcrawler
David Oyelowo, Selma

Best Actress in a Motion Picture Drama

Best Actress in a Motion Picture Drama

Sony Classics

Winner: Julianne Moore, Still Alice

Jennifer Aniston, Cake
Felicity Jones, The Theory of Everything
Rosamund Pike, Gone Girl
Reese Witherspoon, Wild

Best Motion Picture Comedy or Musical

Best Motion Picture Comedy or Musical

20th Century Fox

Winner: The Grand Budapest Hotel

Birdman
Into the Woods
Pride
St. Vincent

Best Actor in a Motion Picture Comedy or Musical

Best Actor in a Motion Picture Comedy or Musical

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Winner: Michael Keaton, Birdman

Ralph Fiennes, The Grand Budapest Hotel
Bill Murray, St. Vincent
Joaquin Phoenix, Inherent Vice
Christoph Waltz, Big Eyes

Best Actress in a TV Drama

Best Actress in a TV Drama

Mark Schafer / Showtime

Winner: Ruth Wilson, The Affair

Claire Danes, Homeland
Viola Davis, How to Get Away With Murder
Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife
Robin Wright, House Of Cards

Best Director

Best Director

IFC Films

Winner: Richard Linklater, Boyhood

Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel
Ava Duvernay, Selma
David Fincher, Gone Girl
Alejandro González Iñárritu, Birdman

Best Actor in a TV Drama

Best Actor in a TV Drama

Nathaniel Bell / Netflix

Winner: Kevin Spacey, House of Cards

Clive Owen, The Knick
Liev Schrieber, Ray Donovan
James Spader, The Blacklist
Dominic West, The Affair

Best TV Drama

Best TV Drama

Showtime

Winner: The Affair, Showtime

Downton Abbey, PBS
Game of Thrones, HBO
The Good Wife, CBS
House of Cards, Netflix

Best Actress in a Mini-Series or TV Movie

Best Actress in a Mini-Series or TV Movie

Sundance TV

Winner: Maggie Gyllenhaal, The Honorable Woman

Jessica Lange, American Horror Story: Freak Show
Frances McDormand, Olive Kitteridge
Frances O’Connor, The Missing
Allison Tolman, Fargo

Best Foreign Language Film

Best Foreign Language Film

Sony Pictures Classics

Winner: Leviathan, Russia

Force Majeure Turist, Sweden
Gett: The Trial of Viviane, Israel
Ida, Poland/Denmark
Tangerines Mandariinid, Estonia

Best Actor in a TV Comedy

Best Actor in a TV Comedy

Amazon Studios

Winner: Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent

Louis C.K., Louie
Don Cheadle, House of Lies
Ricky Gervais, Derek
William H. Macy, Shameless

Best Screenplay

Best Screenplay

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Winner: Alejandro González Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, and Armando Bo, Birdman

Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel
Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl
Richard Linklater, Boyhood
Graham Moore, The Imitation Game

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

IFC

Winner: Patricia Arquette, Boyhood

Jessica Chastain, A Most Violent Year
Keira Knightley, The Imitation Game
Emma Stone, Birdman
Meryl Streep, Into the Woods

Best Animated Feature Film

Best Animated Feature Film

DreamWorks Animation

Winner: How to Train Your Dragon 2

Big Hero Six
The Book of Life
Boxtrolls
The Lego Movie

Best Actress in a Motion Picture Comedy or Musical

Best Actress in a Motion Picture Comedy or Musical

The Weinstein Company

Winner: Amy Adams, Big Eyes

Emily Blunt, Into the Woods
Helen Mirren, The Hundred-Foot Journey
Julianne Moore, Map to the Stars
Quvenzhané Wallis, Annie

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Mini-Series, or TV Movie

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Mini-Series, or TV Movie

Jojo Whilden / HBO

Winner: Matt Bomer, The Normal Heart

Alan Cumming, The Good Wife
Colin Hanks, Fargo
Bill Murray, Olive Kitteridge
Jon Voight, Ray Donovan

Best Original Song

Winner: “Glory,” John Legend and Common (Selma)

“Big Eyes,” Lana del Rey (Big Eyes)
“Mercy Is,” Patty Smith and Lenny Kaye (Noah)
“Opportunity,” Greg Kurstin, Sia Furler, and Will Gluck (Annie)
“Yellow Flicker Beat,” Lorde (The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 1)

Best Original Score

Best Original Score

Focus Features

Winner: Jóhann Jóhannsson, The Theory of Everything

Alexandre Desplat, The Imitation Game
Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, Gone Girl
Antonio Sanchez, Birdman
Hans Zimmer, Interstellar

Best TV Comedy

Best TV Comedy

Amazon

Winner: Transparent, Amazon

Girls, HBO
Jane The Virgin, The CW
Orange Is the New Black, Netflix
Silicon Valley, HBO

Best Actress in a TV Comedy

Best Actress in a TV Comedy

Tyler Golden/The CW

Winner: Gina Rodriguez, Jane the Virgin

Lena Dunham, Girls
Edie Falco, Nurse Jackie
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep
Taylor Schilling, Orange Is the New Black

Best Actor in a Mini-Series or TV Movie

Best Actor in a Mini-Series or TV Movie

Chris Large/FX

Winner: Billy Bob Thornton, Fargo

Martin Freeman, Fargo
Woody Harrelson, True Detective
Matthew McConaughey, True Detective
Mark Ruffalo, The Normal Heart

Best Mini-Series or TV Movie

Best Mini-Series or TV Movie

Chris Large / FX

Winner: Fargo, FX

The Missing, Starz
The Normal Heart, HBO
Olive Kitteridge, HBO
True Detective, HBO

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Mini-Series, or TV Movie

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Mini-Series, or TV Movie

Nick Briggs/Carnival Film and Television Limited 2013 for MASTERPIECE

Winner: Joanne Froggatt, Downton Abbey

Uzo Aduba, Orange Is the New Black
Kathy Bates, American Horror Story: Freak Show
Allison Janney, Mom
Michelle Monaghan, True Detective

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture

Daniel McFadden

Winner: J.K. Simmons, Whiplash

Robert Duvall, The Judge
Ethan Hawke, Boyhood
Edward Norton, Birdman
Mark Ruffalo, Foxcatcher