Tag Archives: black films

The Kush Film Boutique Video Highlights 2016

16.04.2016

KUSH_FB_LOGO_whiteonblack

 

Watch all the video highlights from our 2016 ‘Film Boutique’ Film Club Event.

The Film Boutique happens each month at the plush Regent Street Cinema, 309 Regent Street, London, W1B 2UW.

Join us for the best in indie and mainstream films, Celebrity guests, Fellow filmmakers & Genuine Film-loving patrons supporting the work Kush has done over the last 18 years building a platform for urban filmmakers.  .

 

If you have a short or feature film please let us know as we may want to screen your film at the renowned Film Boutique.

We can also support UK and International distribution and marketing of the right films where there is a working budget specifically for distribution/marketing.

Send films/trailers to: info@kushfilms.com
Tel: + 44 (0) 203 070 3200 / + 44 (0) 7961 977 749

 

Hard Time Bus – Romance at Kush Film Boutique – 17 March 2016

KUSH_FB_LOGO_whiteonblack

We are back and in full swing with the UK’s leading exhibition platform for urban/black films; the people’s favourite film club the ‘Kush Film Boutique’ 

Join us in March for fun and games (find a gentlemen seat-filler), enjoy lovely soft soul and reggae music in the bar from our DJ, Take part in our filmmakers Q&A and get ready for the after-film panel discussion on the hot topic of “Relationship Commitment” led by comedian Kojo – Oh and don’t forget the great new British Romantic Drama Hard Time Bus.

This all takes place at our new London home the plush and historic Regent Street Cinema (the UK’s historical first ever cinema where the first film ever screened in the UK by the pioneer Lumière Brothers was screened in 1896).

Join us for our next exciting fun-filled romance-themed screening event on Thursday 17th March 2016.


Kush Films
presents a UK exclusive screening of award-winning indie brit-flik Hard Time Bus.
This award-winning romantic-drama focusses on the relationship issue of long-term commitment, an issue that affects many a relationship in 2016.

HardTime_Bus_PosterSo come along and join in the debate as after this film; there will be a special panel discussion on present day ‘Relationship Commitment’ with our invited guest all-male panel.

Invited Panel Guests:
Comedian KOJO 
Kojo_comedian

Along with lead HTB actor
Neil Reidman
Neil_Reidman

&
Sports-model/Broadcaster
Darren Placid
Darren-Placid_Headshot

 

 

 

 

Along with Hard Time Bus screenwriter
Owen Mowatt.

Guest Host for the night will be the lovely:
Ms Jenni Steele
Jennie-Steele_Host

Before the film there will be fun and games in the bar and just for you our patrons a live DJ set with lovely romantic music (soft soul, lover rocks etc)  played in the bar.

Fun and games include: Kush finding single ladies (including pairs or groups) a vetted gentleman seat-fillers to sit close to them (can be right next too also?) to keep our lady guests entertained throughout the night.

Music by Jazzy D.

Book Tickets Here: https://www.regentstreetcinema.com/programme/hard-time-bus/

Don’t MISS this fun-filled screening event – you know we screen films like no-one else in the UK, what we do is unique, sheer entertainment and always centred around you; our patrons – You the audience comes first!

After a rude awakening, Mark Bishop`s carefree and complacent lifestyle comes crashing back to reality, forcing him to make hasty plans to marry devoted girlfriend, Denise. He turns to best mate Fitzy for advice only to be ridiculed for not following the ‘Fitzy Rules’ – “never marry and never settle”. Mark’s life begins to unravel as he tries to manage the expectations of those closest to him and soon learns that with complacency comes risk.

Starring: Neil Reidman, Roger Griffiths, Naomi Ryan, Michael Ellis, Tashan Sinclair-Doyle, Anthony Warren & Bailey Patrick.

Written by Owen Mowatt and Directed by Dean Charles
Produced by: Nicola Gregory
2014/ UK / 15 / 85 mins

  • Winner Best Feature – Hollywood Black Film Festival
  • Nominated in several categories at the American Black Film Festival
  • Best Feature at MVSA

Book Tickets Here: https://www.regentstreetcinema.com/programme/hard-time-bus/

Date: Thurs 17th March 2016
Time: 7.30pm – Bar/Networking / 8.30pm: Film starts
Venue: Regent Street Cinema, 309 Regent Street, London, W1B 2UW
Tickets: £15 (student £11)

Music by: Jazzy D

For more info:
T: 0203 070 3200
M: 07961 977 749
E: info@kushfilms.com

Twitter: @KushFilmsOnline@Kush_Online
FB: KushFilmsOnline

 

Supported by Media Partners:

www.colourfulradio.com | www.voice-online.co.uk | www.pridemagazine.com
2016_FBSponsors_Logos

 

12 Years A Slave on the March towards the Oscars

By Marlon Palmer
21 February 2014

The_Bafta_Film_AwardsFacesTo say that 12 years a slave was one of the success stories of the recent BAFTA awards would be an understatement. Nominated for ten of the major awards, the film won arguably the two most competitive; best picture and best actor, awarded to a jubilant Chiwetel Ejiofor.

The BAFTAs was once again a star-studded event with world-famous actors and actresses lining the red carpet. Names like; Angelina Jollie, Brad Pitt, Michael Fassbender, Leonardo DiCaprio and arguably the most famous of them all, the President of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, Prince William turned out for another memorable evening.

With the nominations released back in early January people had been speculating for a little over a month about what films they thought would win the major awards. With 11 nominations, Gravity, staring George Clooney and Sandra Bullock, who missed the awards as she was looking after her ill three-year-old son, was expected to clean up, and with six BAFTAs to its name by the end of the night that was the case.

American Hustle with arguably the most household names in the same film received ten Barkhad Abdinominations and three awards in what many would consider a good night, taking into account the competition. Unfortunately, for the cast and crew, critically acclaimed Captain Philips starring Tom Hanks, which had received nine nominations, picked up just the one award; best supporting actor, which was awarded to Somalian new-comer Barkhad Abdi.

 


A night that belonged to 12 Years a Slave

bafta awardsWhile 12 Years a Slave picked up one less award than American Hustle, many film critics believe that it had a more successful night. The film, which has also been nominated for nine Academy Awards, had been named film of the year by a number of the biggest critics in the British media.

However, quite possibly the most prestigious award Best Picture still came as a shock to the majority of people involved with 12 Years a Slave as Gravity, which broke box-office records, was almost expected to win.

As well as best picture, 12 Years A Slave star 36-year-old Chiwetel Ejiofor from Forest Gate won best actor over stiff competition in the form of Leonardo DiCaprio for The Wolf of Wall Street, Tom Hanks for Captain Phillips and Christian Bale for American Hustle.

12 Years a Slave was also nominated for the following acting and directing awards, best:

  •      Supporting actor (Michael Fassbender)
  •      Director (Steve McQueen)
  •      Supporting actress (Lupita Nyong’o)

12 Years a Slave was undoubtedly one of the biggest success stories of the BAFTAs. With the black historical theme of the film; black director Steve McQueen directing, and a number of very talented black actors in the main leading roles its surprising this film hasn’t been categorised as a black or urban film, as so often happens with other films with that make up of cast and crew conveying the black life experience. 12 YAS could now potentially go on and win a few Oscars.

At Kush Promotions, we are proud of the role that we played in the marketing campaign of a hugely successful film, a film which once again bought back vivid memories of the horrors and inhumane treatment of one branch of the human family, which should never been forgotten and should be once again use to highlight the continued present day trafficking of human life.

12 Years A Slave is still in selected cinemas – go see it if you haven’t!

Hey; spread the word: Kush hopes to confirm soon that we will be working on a new major black film based on an award winning Nigerian book that will be released in the UK entitled “Half of A Yellow HOAYS_Intl_QuadC_Awards_v5BSun” starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Thandie Newton and John Boyega (young star of UK urban film “Attack The Block”), this film will be coming to cinemas soon in March 2014.

Oh don’t forget to go see new comedy “Ride Along” starring my favourite comedian Kevin Hart and fellow star Ice Cube in cinemas on general release starting next weekend Friday 28th February.

 

Barkhad Abdi wins Best Supporting Actor at the BAFTAs

Director Steve McQueen & 12 Years a Slave wins Best Film BAFTA

BAFTA Highlights

Lets Support CRIME & Help Them Change The Lives of Disadvantaged Young People

CRIME stands for Creating Role Models a London based organisation whose aims are to support young people and their efforts to leave gang life, highlight issues around the abuse of young people and ultimately provide development opportunities towards new life-changing careers in the media industry.

If you pay to watch this new short film you will then be contributing to changing the lives of our disadvantaged young people through the work ‘Creating Roles Models’ does in the community – without your support they will not be able to do the work they do as funding through government agencies is hard to come by these days and when it is gained, its often very restrictive.

You can also gain a small percentage of profits by sharing this video with as many friends as you can – so please also share.

A film by Fredi Nwaka & the Gridlock Team

50% of the proceeds from sales will go towards the ‘IM A SURVIVOR’ campaign, giving young people who have been abused a voice and help with both physical and mental healing.

medium_some_things_one_sheet_web_resSOME THINGS… is an independent, short film written and directed by Fredi ‘KRUGA’ Nwaka and produced by GRIDLOC FILMS.

The world can be a cruel place and inner city London is no exception. When an innocent young girl becomes caught up in a world of sexual abuse and emotional blackmail her life quickly spirals out of control.

What happens when you feel betrayed by the very person whose supposed to protect you? What do you do? Who do you turn to?

WE ALL HAVE SECRETS!

SOME WE TAKE WITH US TO THE GRAVE and others….TAKE US TO THE GRAVE!

Inspired by true events this film is about when hope, courage, determination and faith just isn’t enough.

SOME THINGS… can’t be fixed!

This is not just a film… its a journey…

One that will not only touch every one who watches it but also may help save a life or two and encourage other young people to talk up.

www.creatingrolemodels.com

The Butler: Michael Dequina Film Review

TheButler_youngLadServes

Written by Michael Dequina © 2013

Upon the most brief and superficial of glances, it’s easy, if not somewhat understandable, to approach Lee Daniels’ The Butler with some trepidation.

After all, history be damned, another high profile Hollywood film about African-Americans doing domestic service work?  But to dismiss the film off hand is to not give director Daniels and screenwriter Danny Strong their proper due for the value of the story they tell–and not necessarily speaking in terms of its notable fact-based story: that of a White House butler who served under seven presidents from the 1950s to the 1980s.

The fact that said butler, here in fictionalized form named Cecil Gaines (played for most of the movie by Forest Whitaker, with a strong assist from Michael Rainey Jr. and Aml Ameen as younger incarnations), was a witness to such revolutionary eras of socio-political change, particularly for African-Americans, in such close proximity to the nation’s commanders-in-chief is indeed remarkable.  However, for all the monumental signpost events touched on and recognizable actors taking on the roles of various iconic figures (such as, for a start, Robin Williams, James Marsden, Liev Schreiber, John Cusack, and Alan Rickman are seen as Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, and Reagan, respectively; Nelsan Ellis as Martin Luther King; Jane Fonda as Nancy Reagan), what ultimately registers and resonates most strongly is *not* the film’s brisk and showy tour of 20th Century American history, particularly in terms of racial politics.

Where Daniels and Strong truly engage is in the uncommonly seen story and experience of a late-in-life self-actualization, following the intimate, gradual internal journey as Cecil slowly, inevitably grows away and out from the comfortable silence of servitude to an awakening and awareness of his own value, place, and identity as an individual in the world and, above all else, within his own family.   But this is all painted in a more complex way than merely an arc of a silent bystander discovering his voice and strength.  Rather, it’s one in allowing his strength to develop and evolve with the times; one witnesses how adopting such an outwardly passive role from an early age was a necessary and rather brave survival tactic in the era of his youth, especially after witnessing the brutal loss of his father (a briefly seen but effective David Banner) as a child; and as times progress, so do prevailing attitudes shift from one of remaining in sheltered safety to daring to take the risk of proactive self-expression.

Serving as both a counterpoint and unexpected complement to Cecil’s journey is the rising political consciousness of his eldest son Louis (a terrific David Oyelowo).  His more militant trajectory naturally causes conflict within the more traditional values of Gaines household, but if Cecil is able to ultimately take from his son inspiration to be more assertive, Louis learns from his father’s example that one can still fight the existing power without compromising his own by being constructive rather than destructive.

As Cecil’s loyal but often neglected wife Gloria, Oprah Winfrey reminds that not for nothing did she first win major widespread attention as an actress, and her natural empathy that has made her such a multimedia phenomenon over the decade’s works to her advantage in this return to the screen.   If some of her darker struggles, such as her oft-mentioned but only momentarily seen struggles with alcohol, are somewhat glossed over, Winfrey effortlessly connects the viewer to those ups and downs.  But no one connects as strongly, powerfully as Whitaker. Cecil is a deceptively simple and exceedingly difficult part to pull off, what with his relatively few words and placid inaction for most of the film; but appropriately for a film that follows a lead character whose largely a witness, Whitaker’s ever-observing, ever-expressive eyes tell the tale of how he actively processes, thinks, and feels even if outwardly he may appear as nothing more, as his job requires, than a virtually invisible bystander.

Daniels’s measured, deceptively unadorned direction works in a similar fashion.  Far removed from the brash, in-your-face, go-for-broke approach that has largely characterized the films he’s thus far either directed or  produced, he exhibits a mature restraint not only in terms of his own body of work but in terms of decades-spanning historical films, with broader melodrama often sidestepped in favour of a more straightforward,  matter-of-fact depiction.  If, as the film bounces from historical event to historical event, this may feel somewhat routine as a moment-to-moment to viewing experience, it effectively places the viewer squarely in Cecil’s literal and figurative vantage point–not only as a fly-on-the-wall observer to the stream of events, but also how the effect of the experiences build to a far-from-routine cumulative catharsis that one could not so easily foresee. Much like the butler by the end of his film journey, a still, silent viewing audience is moved, perhaps to a surprising degree, by the totality of the entire experience, and maybe even enlightened and inspired by discoveries not so much about the world than what the events of it illuminate about oneself.

Michael Dequina
The Movie Report: http://themoviereport.com


The Butler is in UK Cinemas Now
More info Here

Academy Conversations: The Cast & Director of The Butler in Conversation