Tag Archives: bafta

The EE BAFTA’S – Winners Round-Up & Usual Diversity Issues!

Written By Graeme Wood
09.02.15

 

BAFTA_Winners

Champagne and back slapping at the ready, it’s another year and another awards ceremony! This years BAFTA film awards held no surprises for anyone who had even a cursory glance through the nominations or looked at award winners so far this year. While there was some worthy winners amongst the technical nominees the big awards could all have been safely predicted ahead of the ceremony.

JK Simmons was a shoe-in for Best Supporting Actor following his mesmerising and powerful performance in Whiplash, as was the critically acclaimed Eddie Redmayne picking up ‘Best Actor’, BAFT_JK-Simmonsfor his touching portrayal of Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything. Julianne Moore picked up ‘Best Actress’ but has already received several nominations and prizes for her role in the yet to be seen in the UK movie Still Alice and similarly Patricia Arquette, picking up ‘Best Supporting Actress’, has received several nominations and awards for her turn in Boyhood.

The clear winners of the evening were Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, winning Best Director and Best Film, and James Marsh’s The Theory of Everything, picking up ‘Outstanding British Film’ and Adapted Screenplay. Birdman and The Grand Budapest Hotel were left running just behind with Birdman’s Emmanuel Lubezki picking up the much deserved Cinematography BAFTA. While Wes Anderson’s quirky The Grand Budapest Hotel picked up awards for ‘Costume Design, Make-Up, Music, Production and Best Screenplay’. Damian Chazelle’s Whiplash deservedly picked up the awards for its Editing and Sound the two combined in the film to provide a mesmerising back-drop to JK Simmons and Miles Teller’s powerful performances.

The popular Pride was granted some recognition and picked up the award for Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer. The EE ‘Rising Star’ Award had strong competition but the public vote went to ‘71s charismatic Jack O’Connell a choice which also seemed popular with the BAFTA audience.
BAFTA_JOConnell&McAvoy

Surprisingly The Imitation Game which has already had many awards and nominations elsewhere failed to pick up anything despite being nominated in several categories. Christopher Nolan’s ‘Interstellar’ which failed to light up the box office or critics also missed out on any of the big nominations.

The biggest disappointment from the awards however surely came from the nominations themselves and the films that failed to pick up even a cursory nod from the judging panel. It truly astounds that critically acclaimed and popular films such as Amma Asante’s ‘Belle’ failed to receive a nomination, even for its outstanding costume design, or that the powerful and relevant ‘Selma’ failed to be recognised by the panel. Surely when you have a British talent like David Oyelowo giving a strong performance that is critically acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic it deserves to be recognised? There is also a strong argument that Timothy Spall’s outstanding performance in Mike Leigh’s Mr Turner deserved a place in the Best Actor category.

All eyes are now on the 87th Academy Awards which take place on the 22nd of February, will Boyhood continue its run of wins as Best Picture or will the inclusion of Selma see an Academy turnaround? Can Richard Linklater nab the Best Director Oscar or will Wes Anderson see recognition for The Grand Budapest Hotel. David Oyelowo is missing again from the Best Actor nominations so we might see Eddie Redmayne continue his winning streak although the inclusion of Bradley Cooper and American Sniper’s strong box-office performance may be a surprise winner. Julianne MooreBAFTA_JulianneMoore seems likely at this point to walk away with Best Actress and I’d be very surprised, and a little disappointed, if JK Simmons doesn’t come away with Best Supporting Actor. Patricia Arquette seems likely to continue her winning streak as Best Supporting Actress for Boyhood, though Emma Stone is also a hot contender for her performance in Birdman. While the wonderful Lego Movie managed to pick up Best Animated Feature at this year’s BAFTA it’s bizarrely been missed out of the Oscar nominations so don’t be surprised if Big Hero 6 walks away as this year’s winner.

John Stephen’s and Lonnie Lynn’s ‘Glory’ from Selma has been nominated and is expected to win this year’s ‘Best Song’ Oscar but wouldn’t it be fun if ‘Everything is Awesome’ from the Lego Movie won instead?

It all depends of course on how much relevance you place on the nominations, awards and industry panels against your own preferences and views. Away from the plaudits, box office and competition a bigger issue lay in the representation of our culture and the industry itself. Looking at the BAFTA audience, nominees and winners all many viewers could see were row after row of Caucasian faces and surely this can not be an accurate representation of the diverse body of filmmakers or challenging films that have been produced throughout the last year.

Not so long ago the nominees and audience were full of fresh new hopefuls like Adam Deacon, Noel Clarke, Chiwetel Ejifor, Sophie Okonedo, David Harewood, Idris Elba and some of these have adam_deaconsubsequently found more prominent opportunities and work abroad rather than in the UK. The broadsheets have been quick to point out the lack of diversity from the BAFTA ceremony, particularly Chris Bryant in his column for the Independent. New initiatives (especially from the BFI & TV sector) have become meaningless, which are not worth their weight in hope.

So the debate meanwhile continues but none the less as we have seen over the years there is no significant change. However, it is evident that more work and career opportunities leading to prestige international exposure for minority film industry personnel would certainly bring a higher diversified profile to the UK film industry and so the question must be asked of BAFTA why no recognition for films like; Selma, Belle, Honeytrap, Second Coming and the many other diverse cinema offerings produced from a home-grown pool of black, Asian and minority ethnic talent. A recent Taking Part survey concluded that black and minority ethnic participation in the arts lags nearly 10 per cent behind white participation. It’s a disturbing under-representation for a community that consists of 12 per cent of the total population.

If this year’s BAFTA’s failed to totally represent the cinema audience or the UK talent pool it did however signal a growing strength and confidence in British film making which can only be for the good of the industry as whole (we hope?).

Read Chris Bryant MP Independent Newspaper article here:
http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/baftas-2015-britain-is-diverse-so-why-is-our-tv-and-film-so-overwhelmingly-white-10034762.html

British Director Amma Asante is honoured

By Graeme Wood
17.11.14

ASANTE HONOURED BY WMC IN NEW YORK
Amma+Asante+BAFTA+LA+Brits+WatchB
ritish director Amma Asante was honoured with the Award for ‘Directorial Excellence’ in New York recently by the Women’s Media Centre. Streatham born Asante has been picking up accolades for her film ‘Belle’, now available on download and DVD, the film has become the indie success of the past summer grossing over 10 million dollars worldwide.

Asante started out as a child actress in the BBC’s Grange Hill series but took to script writing soon after, getting commissions from the BBC and Film 4. Her first series Brothers and Sisters’ later aired on BBC2 and in 2005 she picked up a BAFTA for her debut film ‘A Way Of Life’.

Earlier this year Asante’s work was showcased by BAFTA in the ‘Brits to Watch’ events held in New York and LA. Variety then added her to their ‘Top Ten Directors to Watch’ list. The success of Belle Ama-Asante -baftahas seen Asante become a hot property in the US and led to Warner Brothers inviting her to direct her first Hollywood studio film – the forthcoming ‘Unforgettable’. Though the project was announced in January the ‘Fatal Attraction’ style thriller appears to still be in development. The success of ‘Belle’ however, is likely to ensure Asante will continue to be a growing force in the media and she recently announced her next indie project would be ‘Where Hands Touch’.

Asante has also been announced as a key speaker at the Screen Film Summit which takes place at the BFI on December 1st, the writer-director will discuss her career to date and the challenges facing the UK industry.

Read a recent Guardian interview with Amma Asante here:
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/may/18/amma-asante-belle-bicultural-ghanaian-british-director-grange-hill

The Evening Standard interviews Ama Asante in 2005 here:
http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/film/mum-and-dad-never-showed-fear-7193589.html

And the WMC Feature Profile:
http://www.womensmediacenter.com/feature/entry/how-a-woman-director-found-her-voice

Tickets for the Screen Film Summit and the full programme of events can be found here: www.screenfilmsummit.com

Submit Your Short Films: TriForce Short Film Festival

 

 

 

 

Hey its, Jimmy Akingbola here,
Yes me from TV series “REV” & Holby City.
Jimmy-copy

 

I would like to inform you about my TriForce Short Film Festival. My focus is to reach as many diverse filmmakers as possible from all types of backgrounds.

We are offering FREE Submissions for all films that are 5 mins or under.

All in all the past few months have been a remarkable whirlwind. My company TriForce Promotions have just been awarded the Paul Hamlyn Fund and our key focus is diversity and inclusion and we are looking for support from people that believe in what we are doing.

Paul Hamyln Fund News: http://triforcepromotions.co.uk/blog/2014/06/09/triforce-promotions-awarded-paul-hamlyn-breakthrough-fund-grant/

This year’s TFSFF (TriForce Short Film Festival) is again at BAFTA, in Piccadilly, central London on November 22nd (11.00am – 11.00pm) and as always it’s about increasing diversity practically and with our open access ethos.

This year is an important one as it’s the first time we have approached the national press (10 years of doing what we do without funding and we feel it’s about time that more people knew about what we do and can offer.)

I think this is an important event that everyone should support and be part of because of our diverse and high profile network plus all the outcomes we achieve for film makers, creatives and actors. We are working really hard to make sure our festival is not London centric and that its reaching all film makers be they emerging or established and no matter their background.

Click here for more Festival info: http://tfsff.triforcepromotions.co.uk

Additional press info:
http://cinemajam.com/mag/interviews/fraser-ayres
http://thefilmreview.com/film-news/triforce-short-film-festival-2014.html
http://londonflairpr.com/press-kits/triforcepromotions/tfsff2014

Check out more info on our events page here:

My company TriForce Promotions is a unique company with unprecedented outcomes that creates opportunities for individuals and companies to develop and thrive within the industry; No matter their background or circumstances. The TriForce Short Film Festival was created to showcase and exhibit the most captivating, diverse and innovative short content, with the core aim of opening the doors to the film industry to individuals who may not otherwise have the opportunity.

Jimmy Akingbola (aka Mr Nice)
Managing Director
TriForce Promotions
www.triforcepromotions.co.uk
www.jimmyakingbola.com
@TFSFF2014
@TriForceEvents

12 Years A Slave on the March towards the Oscars

By Marlon Palmer
21 February 2014

The_Bafta_Film_AwardsFacesTo say that 12 years a slave was one of the success stories of the recent BAFTA awards would be an understatement. Nominated for ten of the major awards, the film won arguably the two most competitive; best picture and best actor, awarded to a jubilant Chiwetel Ejiofor.

The BAFTAs was once again a star-studded event with world-famous actors and actresses lining the red carpet. Names like; Angelina Jollie, Brad Pitt, Michael Fassbender, Leonardo DiCaprio and arguably the most famous of them all, the President of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, Prince William turned out for another memorable evening.

With the nominations released back in early January people had been speculating for a little over a month about what films they thought would win the major awards. With 11 nominations, Gravity, staring George Clooney and Sandra Bullock, who missed the awards as she was looking after her ill three-year-old son, was expected to clean up, and with six BAFTAs to its name by the end of the night that was the case.

American Hustle with arguably the most household names in the same film received ten Barkhad Abdinominations and three awards in what many would consider a good night, taking into account the competition. Unfortunately, for the cast and crew, critically acclaimed Captain Philips starring Tom Hanks, which had received nine nominations, picked up just the one award; best supporting actor, which was awarded to Somalian new-comer Barkhad Abdi.

 


A night that belonged to 12 Years a Slave

bafta awardsWhile 12 Years a Slave picked up one less award than American Hustle, many film critics believe that it had a more successful night. The film, which has also been nominated for nine Academy Awards, had been named film of the year by a number of the biggest critics in the British media.

However, quite possibly the most prestigious award Best Picture still came as a shock to the majority of people involved with 12 Years a Slave as Gravity, which broke box-office records, was almost expected to win.

As well as best picture, 12 Years A Slave star 36-year-old Chiwetel Ejiofor from Forest Gate won best actor over stiff competition in the form of Leonardo DiCaprio for The Wolf of Wall Street, Tom Hanks for Captain Phillips and Christian Bale for American Hustle.

12 Years a Slave was also nominated for the following acting and directing awards, best:

  •      Supporting actor (Michael Fassbender)
  •      Director (Steve McQueen)
  •      Supporting actress (Lupita Nyong’o)

12 Years a Slave was undoubtedly one of the biggest success stories of the BAFTAs. With the black historical theme of the film; black director Steve McQueen directing, and a number of very talented black actors in the main leading roles its surprising this film hasn’t been categorised as a black or urban film, as so often happens with other films with that make up of cast and crew conveying the black life experience. 12 YAS could now potentially go on and win a few Oscars.

At Kush Promotions, we are proud of the role that we played in the marketing campaign of a hugely successful film, a film which once again bought back vivid memories of the horrors and inhumane treatment of one branch of the human family, which should never been forgotten and should be once again use to highlight the continued present day trafficking of human life.

12 Years A Slave is still in selected cinemas – go see it if you haven’t!

Hey; spread the word: Kush hopes to confirm soon that we will be working on a new major black film based on an award winning Nigerian book that will be released in the UK entitled “Half of A Yellow HOAYS_Intl_QuadC_Awards_v5BSun” starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Thandie Newton and John Boyega (young star of UK urban film “Attack The Block”), this film will be coming to cinemas soon in March 2014.

Oh don’t forget to go see new comedy “Ride Along” starring my favourite comedian Kevin Hart and fellow star Ice Cube in cinemas on general release starting next weekend Friday 28th February.

 

Barkhad Abdi wins Best Supporting Actor at the BAFTAs

Director Steve McQueen & 12 Years a Slave wins Best Film BAFTA

BAFTA Highlights